#TempleUniversity #TempleMade #Temple #Philadelphia #Philly

#TempleUniversity #TempleMade #Temple #Philadelphia #Philly

#Philly

#Philly

I wanna use it! #Sony #Rokinon #Film #Camera #MyBaby

I wanna use it! #Sony #Rokinon #Film #Camera #MyBaby

Short Stories - Prosthetic's Anonymous

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Hot Topic: Racism and the New Black Codes

lilithfilm:

The news cycle is hot with racism. The Donald Sterling lifetime ban has created ripples, with people anointing Adam Silver as a champion for Civil Rights and the ban being a “historic” moment for America.

Forgive me for my skepticism, but the ban of Donald Sterling has done very little to address…

leoreturns:

I have been waiting all year to post this.

leoreturns:

I have been waiting all year to post this.

shortfilmmasterpieces:

Good Grief

ingthing:

beamkatanachronicles:

thepurpleeyedone:

beamkatanachronicles:

thepurpleeyedone:

beamkatanachronicles:

appleseeddrama:

THEY HAVE THE ACE ATTORNEY OFFICIAL MANGA IN MY LAW LIBRARY I AM CRYING.



Your honor, something is amiss here!
As you are probably aware, library materials are labeled with barcodes as well as a number to determine their location on the shelf, as per the Dewey Decimal System. The books just to the left of the manga are labeled, as are the DVDs just in view on the lower shelf. Look even further behind these shelves and you’ll see that even those books are labeled! 
Ladies and gentlemen of the courtroom, I invite you to take a closer look at the volumes that are, allegedly, part of this law library! Something is missing from the spines, isn’t there?

Where are the bar codes?!
This is a blatant contradiction! The OP is lying— these volumes cannot, therefore, be a part of this library at all! I propose that they simply brought these materials in for the sake of the joke!! 


Only focusing on one aspect and not the whole of the issue, are we, Mr. Wright? Typical.

Your honor, if you bring your attention to the books just left of the manga, you’ll notice there’s a book (the second to the left) that also does not have a bar code.

If you examine the picture even closer—particularly the DVDs below—you’ll see that they bear bar codes, but not on the spines. No, they have them on the back and/or front of the DVDs. Of course, this method of labeling and organizing isn’t limited to products of the film industry alone.

Therefore, I’d like to propose that it is entirely possible that the manga books do, in fact, belong to the library!


Wh-WHAAAAT?! You’re kidding!! 
(Shoot, he’s got me there… Better think of something fast! Something about the books that sets them apart from—
…! I’ve got it!)
While that may be true, you’ve also overlooked one critical error: the titles of the books! Whether or not your hypothesis regarding the labeling system is correct, these titles aren’t alphabetized correctly! What kind of self-respecting librarian would misplace such vital books? 
Well, Edgeworth?



While it pains me to have to point out something so obvious, I suppose I’ll make an exception for you, Wright.
Clearly, one look at the titles of the books next to the manga is a tell-all of this certain library’s less-than-stellar organization skills. None of the books are in alphabetical order, I’m afraid.

They could very well be alphabetized by author and not title, but it’s a little difficult to be able to decipher that from this single picture, wouldn’t you say?
Furthermore, the manga books themselves are in numerical order, suggesting some kind of system is in place, albeit not a very good one, if the alphabetizing is off.

At the end of the day, it seems like neither of us can draw a clear conclusion from this evidence alone. Your honor, I strongly suggest a recess in which we could investigate the library itself further.

I see the issue here very clearly.
Due to the uncertain nature of this case, we’ll have to postpone this decision until more decisive evidence can be obtained. The court will now take a 15-minute recess.

(W-wait, but I’m not—)


WAIT!!!

I’ve got some decisive evidence for you, pal!

We investigated further into the photo. Zooming in, you can see a label on the DVD case to the bottom left.

Photo Close-up added to the court record!


As you can see, pal, you can vaguely see the words “Of Toledo Law Library” on the label!

And, considering possibilities of the rest of that label, “University of Toledo" was the first to come to my mind!
A quick search on the University of Toledo’s Online Law Library Database revealed that there ARE the comics pictured in it!
Miles Edgeworth Ace Attorney Investigations volumes 1-4 and Phoenix Wright Ace Attorney volumes 1-5!

And there’s more! 
The section these comics are filed under is the “Law in Popular Culture" Section, which matches up with the stickers on the rest of the books on that shelf: "Lowering the Bar: Lawyer Jokes & Legal Culture”, “Prime Time Law”, “Lawyers in Your Living Room!" and "Reel Justice: The Courtroom Goes to the Movies”!
Not only is it in the right section, it’s also a documented part of the Law Library’s database!
How’s that for decisive evidence?

ingthing:

beamkatanachronicles:

thepurpleeyedone:

beamkatanachronicles:

thepurpleeyedone:

beamkatanachronicles:

appleseeddrama:

THEY HAVE THE ACE ATTORNEY OFFICIAL MANGA IN MY LAW LIBRARY I AM CRYING.

image

image

Your honor, something is amiss here!

As you are probably aware, library materials are labeled with barcodes as well as a number to determine their location on the shelf, as per the Dewey Decimal System. The books just to the left of the manga are labeled, as are the DVDs just in view on the lower shelf. Look even further behind these shelves and you’ll see that even those books are labeled! 

Ladies and gentlemen of the courtroom, I invite you to take a closer look at the volumes that are, allegedly, part of this law library! Something is missing from the spines, isn’t there?

image

Where are the bar codes?!

This is a blatant contradiction! The OP is lying— these volumes cannot, therefore, be a part of this library at all! I propose that they simply brought these materials in for the sake of the joke!! 

Only focusing on one aspect and not the whole of the issue, are we, Mr. Wright? Typical.

Your honor, if you bring your attention to the books just left of the manga, you’ll notice there’s a book (the second to the left) that also does not have a bar code.

If you examine the picture even closer—particularly the DVDs below—you’ll see that they bear bar codes, but not on the spines. No, they have them on the back and/or front of the DVDs. Of course, this method of labeling and organizing isn’t limited to products of the film industry alone.

Therefore, I’d like to propose that it is entirely possible that the manga books do, in fact, belong to the library!

image

Wh-WHAAAAT?! You’re kidding!! 

image
(Shoot, he’s got me there… Better think of something fast! Something about the books that sets them apart from—

image
…! I’ve got it!)

While that may be true, you’ve also overlooked one critical error: the titles of the books! Whether or not your hypothesis regarding the labeling system is correct, these titles aren’t alphabetized correctly! What kind of self-respecting librarian would misplace such vital books? 

Well, Edgeworth?

While it pains me to have to point out something so obvious, I suppose I’ll make an exception for you, Wright.

Clearly, one look at the titles of the books next to the manga is a tell-all of this certain library’s less-than-stellar organization skills. None of the books are in alphabetical order, I’m afraid.

They could very well be alphabetized by author and not title, but it’s a little difficult to be able to decipher that from this single picture, wouldn’t you say?

Furthermore, the manga books themselves are in numerical order, suggesting some kind of system is in place, albeit not a very good one, if the alphabetizing is off.

At the end of the day, it seems like neither of us can draw a clear conclusion from this evidence alone. Your honor, I strongly suggest a recess in which we could investigate the library itself further.

I see the issue here very clearly.

image
Due to the uncertain nature of this case, we’ll have to postpone this decision until more decisive evidence can be obtained. The court will now take a 15-minute recess.

image

(W-wait, but I’m not—)

image

WAIT!!!

I’ve got some decisive evidence for you, pal!

We investigated further into the photo. Zooming in, you can see a label on the DVD case to the bottom left.

Photo Close-up added to the court record!

As you can see, pal, you can vaguely see the words “Of Toledo Law Library” on the label!

And, considering possibilities of the rest of that label, “University of Toledo" was the first to come to my mind!

A quick search on the University of Toledo’s Online Law Library Database revealed that there ARE the comics pictured in it!

Miles Edgeworth Ace Attorney Investigations volumes 1-4 and Phoenix Wright Ace Attorney volumes 1-5!

And there’s more! 

The section these comics are filed under is the “Law in Popular Culture" Section, which matches up with the stickers on the rest of the books on that shelf: "Lowering the Bar: Lawyer Jokes & Legal Culture”, “Prime Time Law”, “Lawyers in Your Living Room!" and "Reel Justice: The Courtroom Goes to the Movies”!

Not only is it in the right section, it’s also a documented part of the Law Library’s database!

How’s that for decisive evidence?

This sentence has five words. Here are five more words. Five-word sentences are fine. But several together become monotonous. Listen to what is happening. The writing is getting boring. The sound of it drones. It’s like a stuck record. The ear demands some variety. Now listen. I vary the sentence length, and I create music. Music. The writing sings. It has a pleasant rhythm, a lilt, a harmony. I use short sentences. And I use sentences of medium length. And sometimes, when I am certain the reader is rested, I will engage him with a sentence of considerable length, a sentence that burns with energy and builds with all the impetus of a crescendo, the roll of the drums, the crash of the cymbals—sounds that say listen to this, it is important.
The Machismo Mother

            In this essay I will cover several films: Alien and Aliens. Each is directed by a different person, but both are equally as compelling and both have extremely strong images. I will not only tackle the complex character of Ellen Ripley, as well as the horses she rides in on i.e. the ships. I have two goals: To distinguish the differences within the ships and the paternal (masculine)/maternal (feminine) role change between movies for Ripley.  

            In the opening sequence of Alien (Ridley Scott, 1979) we are presented with an enormous, black ship named Nostromo.  Within its air tight walls reside the interweaving gas pipes, long hollow corridors, bright and dim neon lights, several control panels, a cafeteria, a central command room, and a sleeping chamber where are soon-to-be dead passengers awake. The Nostromo is monitored, sustained, and controlled by an artificial computer named “Mother” and its crew are essentially the children. At this moment the crew are not the focal point, the ship itself is the concerning issue. For the most part the ship is harmless, like any and all machinery, but by the end of the film, the Nostromo becomes a part of the terror that takes place within its very hallways. The ship, in some way, represents the female body. Mostly due to the AI computer system, as well as the corridors that take the form of a women’s womb. The children of Nostromo or its crew, are frantically traversing the ships long, dark corridors, trying to find a way out, a way to escape the monster, just like the way a new born tries to leave its mother’s womb. The real monster itself, the Xenomorph, must find its way around the endless tubing that is the ship’s hallways and ventilation shafts. Unlike the crew, the Xenomorph is better suited for the dark, claustrophobic corridors, probably because it’s akin to such conditions, or because it is has learn to adapt to its new surroundings. Like the Nostromo, the derelict spaceship, in which the Xenomorph hails from, it too is similar in fashion. Although the ship itself is more dark, humid, the corridors are massive, the walls are both organic and natural (as to suggest life), and like the Nostromo, both ships are identical in nature. Both give life and take it away. “The first… scenario, which takes the form of a birthing, occurs in Alien at the beginning when the camera/spectator explores the inner space of the mother-ship.” (Creed, p. 18) If the Nostromo gives life to the crew, then the alien ship gives life to the face-huggers. Within the alien ship lay thousands of eggs, all of whom are awaiting to be awaken so that they can attach themselves to a host. Which will eventually culminate in the loss of six crew members aboard the Nostromo. Thus completing the circle of life. If the Nostromo and the derelict ship represent maternity/motherhood, then the battle ship from Aliens (James Cameron, 1986) is a metaphor for the phallus. In the opening shots, the camera pans, tracks, and zooms in and out onto missiles, drop ships, crates of weapons, military vehicles, loaders, barracks, and the hibernation chamber (like that of Alien). The entire environment is did up to look like a badass-one-stop-kill-everything-and-anything-shop. Just like in Alien, we learn a little something about our crew, from their paychecks to their cold feet and so on and so forth. All of the men, including the women are built, lean, and obviously strong. Within minutes of being “birthed”, Vasquez (Jenette Goldstein), the butch lesbian, is doing pull-ups. This masculinity is showcased several more times with the confines of the battleship. The crew, after having their bug hunt debriefing, are shown loading up nuclear warheads, piling crates of ammo and weapons into drop ships, eating food and discussing sexual endeavors with off world colonist. The scene not only shows off the moral of the men, but how masculine and macho the marines are. The ship adds to this as well. The ship embodies the crew’s tough, masculinity and encourages them to embrace it. The battle ship, unlike the Nostromo, is meant for war, to wipe out any and all possible threats. With the Nostromo and derelict ship both being metaphorically impregnated with eggs and the Xenomorph, the battle ship is essentially the male or phallus that will try to impregnate LV246 with destruction and death, death of aliens and death to the Queen.

            Ellen Ripley (Sigourney Weaver) goes through many changes with the Alien franchise. In the first Alien film Ripley is masculine in nature. Her backstory, along with the rest of the crew, is unbeknownst to the viewer. Aside from trivial knowledge given to us by the crew i.e. their discrepancy with the pay situation, the horrible food, and the anticipated arrival to earth, the crew is pretty much a closed book. It is not until in Aliens that we get to know more about our heroine. Ripley is basically a back seat driver through the first half of the film, up until Kane (John Hurt) becomes “…violated in an act of phallic penetration.” (Creed, p. 19) After Kane encounters his “rapist” and goes into a coma, Dallas (Tom Skerritt) and Lambert (Veronica Cartwirght) proceed to bring Kane back onto the Nostromo, but Ripley is more concerned with sticking to contamination protocol. This act of disobeying a direct order from her captain is a direct representation of the masculine female.  Or rather what we perceive the phallic female to be like. This representation of the masculine female is apparent throughout the entirety of the film. After some back and forth between Dallas and Ripley, Ash (Ian Holm) opens the airlock and lets Dallas and Lambert in with Kane. Eventually Ripley confronts Ash with a very macho, cocky attitude, displaying her dominance or attempted dominance of the ship. Ripley pokes and prods at Ash, picking apart his intentions, of whether or not they were beneficial to the crew. Ash, at this point, is un-confrontational. The scene opens up with a long tracking shot from the bright corridor to the dark contaminated room where Ash is working on the face-hugger. “That’s amazing. What is it?” says Ripley to Ash. If Ripley were to have, at this point, be represented as a feminine character, we would most likely hear a much different line. The fact that she thinks the thing is amazing, although she comes off very sarcastic, shows that she is being fictitious. This fictitious nature is unbecoming of a female or of a feminine character. This line further proves that Ripley is very much masculine. This fictitious pestering continues as Ash gets backed into the corner like a scared child. “How’s Kane… Our Guest… And you let him in.” Ripley badgers Ash like if she were a young boy picking on the nerdy kid. She questions his intentions, in which he replies, “What would you have done with Kane?” However, we already know what she would have done. Her intentions were to save the crew from contamination, as well as herself. She was, indirectly or not, protecting herself. This protecting of one’s self is a characteristic that is generally associated with men. Not only are we hearing her protest, her condescending attitude towards Ash and his intentions for Kane, but we get a clear understanding of how a masculine female works. She feels little to no empathy for Kane and his condition. Ripley makes sure that Ash knows that he disobeyed her, although she herself did the same with her captain, and that he disregarded the quarantine protocol, which puts them all in danger. A few scenes later, when Dallas is ready to leave the planet so that he can take his crew back home, Ripley questions why he has allowed Ash control over Kane and the specimen. Dallas replies that “…it happens because the company wants it to happen.”Dallas accepts his role as captain of the ship, but Ripley does not agree. She believes that Ash is untrustworthy, and by the tone of her voice, one could argue that if she were captain, she wouldn’t allow Ash to have control over the face-hugger and Kane. Going back to the scene with Ash and Ripley, Ripley makes it clear to Ash that she was in charge. A smirk even graces her face when she says it, thus displaying her masculinity and hunger for control. It’s not until later on in the film when “each of the crew members come face to face with the alien… a monstrous, cannibalistic maternal figure…” (Creed, p. 23) do we get to see a slightly different look at Ripley, but it’s only for a short matter of time. Ripley is much like the alien creature itself. “The alien’s ever changing shape, its chameleon nature…” (Creed, p. 23) Ripley too changings shape. She starts out as fictitious, becomes compliant and passive, then after the death of Dallas, and her brush with death by way of Ash, she turns into a badass, machismo heroine. The only instance where we get to see Ripley act out her maternal nature is when she goes after her cat, Jones. This act signifies that Ripley is not all masculine as she has been throughout the entire film. But one has to wonder what it is about the cat that makes Ripley go into motherhood mode. “One could argue that she saw the aloof Jones as a kindred spirit, sharing the self-preservation instinct that allowed her to be the lone human survivor.” (Naureckas) However, Ripley is still a “ruthless character.” (Naureckas)

            Most characters tend to not switch roles in sequels. Rambo (Sylvestor Stallone) was still the same badass character that he was in Rambo: First Blood Part II (George P. Cosmatos)like he was in First Blood (James Cameron). But unlike Rambo, Ripley changes characters. She goes from a ruthless, aggressive masculine character, to a passive, feminine character who is more concerned with her maternal feelings then she is with “Ramboing” a bunch of aliens. The film Aliens (James Cameron) opens much like the way Alien opened, with sleep. Ripley has been drifting in space for 57 years, along with her buddy Jones. It’s by chance of “blind luck” that she gets rescued by a salvage team. Instead of waking up to a cold floor and shitty food, Ripley snaps out from a nightmare in which a Xenomorph is bursting out of her chest. This becomes a reoccurring dream of hers, but one we only see once. Once again Ripley has to face the monster that killed her entire crew. But she isn’t alone, she will have the help from the United States Colonial Marines. Unlike her new crew, who snarl and grunt at their commanding officer, play games with knives and fingers, and continuously make jokes about one another - “Hey Vasquez, ever been mistaken for a man?”, Ripley is passive, jumpy, and keeps to herself. Although, this new state of mind only last for a short while (it’s not until the end she becomes badass). During this time, Ripley plays more of the maternal role, while her crew engages in masculine, phallic ideologies. “Hey Ripley, don’t worry, me and my squad of ultimate badasses will protect you… check it out… we got nukes, we got knives, sharp sticks…) Hudson (Bill Paxton) says to Ripley as they prepare to drop down on LV246. This masculine behavior is opposite of what Ripley feels. Before this scene, when Ripley is trying to help debrief the marines on what the situation entails, she gets choked up and has a hard time talking about the event that took place on board the Nostromo. Of course the marines joke about the situation, but that’s to offset Ripley’s maternal mindset. Much later on in the film, after the marines clear the drop zone and reassure themselves that the coast is clear of any hostiles, Ripley and the crew encounter their first real problem, a child. This encounter reenergizes Ripley, it’s her transcendence of the weak feminine and into motherhood or into the maternal nature. For those that haven’t seen the director’s cut of Aliens will be unable to understand why Ripley so quickly jumps from a passive, weak character, to a more protective, mother like character. In the director’s version, we get the backstory that was kept from us in Alien. Ripley was on her way home, hoping to make it to her daughter’s 11th birthday party. Of course with the passing event and the 57 years she spent drifting in space, her daughter has since passed away, unbeknownst to her that her mother was still alive. When Ripley encounters Newt (Carrie Henn) she has a newfound place in life. She has a child that she can protect and save and perhaps have a life with. “[Ripley] has a deep maternal relationship with an orphan girl named Newt. She jeopardizes everyone to save Newt from being implanted with an Alien embryo, though the film wrote off its other characters as they were taken away to the egg chambers. Presumably Ripley’s “maternal instinct” must override other considerations.” (Naureckas) This child kicks Ripley’s maternal engine into over drive. Everything from here on out is about making sure this little girl makes it out alive. The scene that makes Ripley’s maternal state most apparent is when she is putting her to bed. “My mommy said there were no monsters, no real ones, but there are.” Newt says to Ripley, in which she replies, “Yes there are, dear.” However, the look on her face when she says this shows that she’d rather have it not be true, so that way, as a mother, she could keep her child safe from harm. This scene explains to us that Ripley is no longer the ruthless, badass, instead she’s just a mother trying to get home to her daughter. But eventually, Ripley, will have to become that badass, ruthless women she once was so long ago. As the rest of her crew slowly becomes overwhelmed with their current situation, Ripley takes over, and transforms into the all-knowing-all-caring mother role. Although, in a quick romantic scene, she learns to use a weapon, including the grenade launcher, but this moment of masculinity is quickly overshadowed by power nap with Newt. The sleep scene registers as a moment of relief for Ripley. Like the nightmare scene, we see Ripley basking in the mother role that she was swiped of in Alien. The way she looks at Newt or how she brushes her hair away from her only like a mother can do, allows the audience to feel empathy towards Ripley and her loss i.e. her daughter. Like I stated previously, Ripley does return to her former self, but this time around she encompasses both the maternal and paternal (masculine) nature. After Ripley saves Newt from her pending doom of becoming a surrogate mother for some Xenomorph, they are thrusted into the Queens lair, where they are faced with a dilemma: Do they kill the Queen or try to escape? “Ripley identifies with the Queen’s need to protect her spawn, but that moment quickly leads to Ripley’s attempt to napalm the Queen and her eggs. We must destroy the alien, especially when we realize it is close to ourselves.”  (Naureckas) Although the Queen herself is a mother, she is not the mother of Newt, which whom Ripley must protect. This scene is quite extraordinary in itself. The image of Ripley holding Newt in one arm and a flame thrower in the other sets up the duality of paternal (masculinity) vs. maternal (femininity) within Ripley. She becomes the badass, ruthless mother that protects her child at all cost, even if that means destroying another’s children. After the final fight scene, where Ripley takes up arms in a mech-loader, the ultimate image for masculinity in regards to a female body, she defeats the Queen. But she does not defeat her with her femininity. Like in Alien, Ripley resorts back to be all masculine. She is all empowered by her ruthless, cutthroat emotions, and with the help of a phallic machine. But after her disposal of the Queen, Newt’s line “Mommy!” brings us back into viewing Ripley not as a masculine female, but as a mother. And like a mother, Ripley tucks in her child, and tells her “Sleep tight.” And smiles at her to let her know that nothing bad is going to happen.

            It’s so rare that we come across a character that changes roles from one film to the next. Ripley goes from ruthless and independent, to weak and passive, to maternal and strong, and back to ruthless while still holding onto her maternal nature. Along with the ever changing character of Ellen Ripley, it takes a good amount of effort to show the contrasting differences with a character by way of environment. The inner workings of the Nostromo, the alien ship, and the battle ship all help to distinguish who we are watching and what to watch for. If I were ever in Ellen Ripley’s shoes I would only ever hope to get the chance to say “Get away from her, you bitch!”

Works Cited

Creed, Barbara. “Horror and the Archaic Mother: Alien.” The Monstrous-feminine: Film, Feminism, Psychoanalysis. London: Routledge, 1993. 18-25. Print.

Naureckas, Jim. “Aliens: Mother and the Teeming Hoardes.” Jump Cut. Jump Cut, n.d. Web. 11 Dec. 2013.

shortfilmmasterpieces:

The Saddest Boy in the World

alexniedtmusic:

I did the dialogue editing, foley, and mixing on this new short film, Bananas, starring Jayma Mays of Glee. It has been on the festival circuit over the last year, and won the Audience Award at the 2013 LA Comedy Festival.

trueAkiba Profile - Online Talent Contest | YOBI.TV

If any of you Tumblr friends get a chance, I just uploaded a video to a contest and would like some support. Folllow the link to my profile and from there you can click on my entries and vote for me. You can also have a look around the site and check out some other talented people. I do believe you have to sign up but it’s quick and easy. Thanks in advance. 

paulbriganti:

Goodfellas steadicam shot with no music. 

maxk215:

I love my city, like no other!

maxk215:

I love my city, like no other!